Is Old-School Pokémon Going to Give my Kids Nightmares?

Pokemon

My kids are officially obsessed with Pokémon. In a way, this is great news for me. After years of dealing with the likes of Thomas and Friends, I can finally bond with them without having to do any research. I was into Pokémon in the 1990s, so the kids are in my wheelhouse now.

I gleefully fired up a game of Pokémon Red for the kids to share my introduction to the franchise with them. Unfortunately, it was only after I got them hooked on the game that I remembered the downside to sharing my childhood entertainment with them: some of those early installments are really messed up.

I’m not talking about the dissonant nature of a game that talks about the importance of treating Pokémon well but then encourages you to capture them and force them to battle. That’s a flaw of the whole franchise, but it falls under the mantle of, “this is just a video game, so don’t overthink it.”

No, I’m talking about a place called Lavender Town. That’s where the original games go from fun-filled adventures with cartoon creatures to creepy horror with some truly disturbing backstory. Lavender Town is where the game introduces ghost Pokémon, and as far as I know it’s the only part of the franchise to really explore death.

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How Do You Talk to Your Kids About Racism in America?

Racism

I live in a small town in New England. Beautiful fall foliage, cold winters, friendly neighbors…the type of place you find on greeting cards. Well, except that most greeting cards don’t mention the occasional racism and Nazi iconography.

That unfortunate graffiti rests on the sidewalk near my kids’ bus stop. The swastika served as a reminder that there are stupid jerks everywhere. It also serves as a reminder that I need to talk to my kids about race in America.

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What Happens When Jailed Women Have Babies? They Become Moms

Incarcerated Mom and Child

In a country with more than 215,000 women in prison as of 2014, what happens to an incarcerated mother-to-be? An estimated three to four percent of women enter prison pregnant, which often means an uncomfortable birth and an immediate separation from their child. One photographer, Cheryl Hanna-Truscott, has used her talents to showcase an alternative.

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Did Adam Conover Really Ruin Breastfeeding?

Breastfeeding

The TV show Adam Ruins Everything gives comedian Adam Conover a platform to dispel some myths in our society. Last month, the show tackled parenting, including the breastfeeding versus formula feeding debate. For those who didn’t catch it, you can watch a segment here. Long story short: You aren’t a failure of a mother if you don’t breastfeed.

Throughout every episode of this show, little blurbs in the corner of the screen show citations that back up each claim. It’s hard to fact-check a comedy show while you’re enjoying it, but I thought it might be interesting to check this segment’s sources. Here are the claims in the clip and their associated citations.

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4 Things from our Past that Kids Think are Older than Dinosaurs

Phone and TypewriterTimes change, and while some iconic images last forever, others fade away. I’m becoming acutely aware that there are some things in my childhood media that my kids will never really understand. These tropes only really made sense in a certain time period, and that time has passed.

This change in popular consciousness is one reason why I’m not enamored with A Christmas Story. It just doesn’t represent my childhood the way it did for my parents. The movie relies on its audience sharing certain experiences, and I never listened to Little Orphan Annie or drank my Ovaltine.

So what will be our kids’ A Christmas Story? It’s hard to say what might find a niche in the public consciousness and stick around, but I’m pretty sure kids will never quite understand these things when they pop up in old media…

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Kids are Surprisingly Good at Spotting Bad Guys

Gaston

How does a kid know the difference between good guys and bad guys in a story? As media becomes more nuanced, it’s sometimes hard to tell. On occasion, they might ask an adult if somebody is good or bad. Often, they have to decide on their own. Don’t worry — kids are remarkably insightful.

Any sort of conflict in a story can bring my daughter to tears. She screamed and openly sobbed when we took her to see Moana, then burst into hysterical laughter at the happy ending. Unfortunately, my wife and I never know what she might find scary or what will leave her completely unfazed.

Read more at BabyCenter.com!