The Many Worlds of D&D, part two

Oriental Adventures

Dungeons & Dragons started as an offshoot of wargaming, but it grew quickly. TSR, the company that owned the game, soon saw that people wanted more than just dungeons and wilderness areas for their heroes to explore. They wanted a semblance of a living fantasy world filled with history, personalities, and adventure.

The earliest settings, which I described last time, grew at the speed of adventure – new information got added as needed for a given module rather than in an atlas-like book. By the 1980s, though, D&D was realizing its media crossover potential. This led to a new wave of campaign settings that had a reach far beyond gaming tables.

Read more at the Screamsheet!

Derrezen the Dragon-God

Derrezen the Dragon-God

Known to many as the great dragon-god, Derrezen is a legendary terror that even demon lords and divine beings try to avoid. With a wingspan that approaches 200 feet in length, tales of the great wyrm blotting out the sun as he flies overhead are barely exaggerated. Fortunately for most, the dragon-god spends most of his time atop his hoard of treasure, and can sleep for years at a time.

Read more at the Screamsheet!

Out Now: “Monstrous Heroes”

Monstrous Heroes

Want to add a kobold paladin, a pixie sorcerer, or a goblin ranger to your Pathfinder game? This week’s TRAILseeker provides tips for incorporating these monstrous PCs into any existing game. It includes new character traits for players who want to explain why their monstrous PCs walk the surface world and how they integrate into “normal” society. Support the TRAILseeker Patreon to get this article and more!

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Out Now: Shaking Up Assumptions

Shaking Up AssumptionsThe Pathfinder Roleplaying Game features dozens of races and classes. Many settings assume that all these species and occupations exist. But what if the GM wants to shake up
assumptions and create world that lacks forest-loving elves, mountain-dwelling
dwarves, or knights in full plate mail? A few adjustments to the standard races and classes in your game can create interesting new settings without having to deviate away from the rules players know so well.

A new article for EN World’s TRAILseeker online magazine, “Shaking Up Assumptions” provides a way for you to create an interesting new setting in moments, just by tweaking the standard Pathfinder race and class lists. It also provides the starting point for two new campaign settings based on these techniques.

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Out Now: Beldenwood: The Town of Bees

Beldenwood: The Town of Bees

A simple town nestled along the edge of a large forest, Beldenwood seems completely mundane save for the near-constant hum that echoes throughout the town. When asked, locals nonchalantly tell newcomers that the hum comes from the nest of giant bees that make its home just north of the town limits. Residents seem completely at ease with the deadly creatures. Welcome to Beldenwood, the Town of Bees!

A new article for EN World’s TRAILseeker online magazine, “Beldenwood: The Town of Bees” details an unusual town that can be placed into any fantasy setting. What sort of challenges and adventures await a town that relies on a hive of giant bees for its livelihood? Read the article to find out!

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The Many Worlds of D&D, part one

Dungeon Master

Dungeons & Dragons has never been about one single fantasy world. In fact, beginning in the 1980s, the game spawned a multiverse that stands on par with anything churned out in the comic book industry. Through the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 2nd edition years especially, D&D became home to dozens of parallel fantasy worlds.

Read more at the Screamsheet!

Gremlins of Greystone Valley

Gremlin“I’m sorry,” Sarah said. “I didn’t notice we were being ambushed until it was too late.”

“Don’t be sorry,” Kay responded. “Gremlins can be all but invisible when they want to be. You probably wouldn’t have seen him even if you’d been looking right at him.”

“It wasn’t . . . really an ambush,” Dax groaned sluggishly. “To them, this is all a game. A very cruel game where somebody will probably get killed. And people wonder why I don’t like to think about ‘fun’ in this valley.”

Known as troublemakers and baby-stealers, gremlins have a reputation for cruel tricks and cunning traps. Like fey, they enjoy pranks, but they are much crueler about them. A faerie might have a laugh by turning a person’s nose blue, but a gremlin would find it funnier to cut that person’s nose right off.

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